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19th Century Europe  

Last Updated: Feb 27, 2017 URL: http://libguides.opsu.edu/19thcentury Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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Introduction

Welcome to the 19th Century Europe libguide.  It was designed to assist you in HIST 4653.  Each tab contains research topics for the class, along with links to books for each topic.  For those topics that are well-represented in the library, only three books are mentioned.  Feel free to do more research on your own.  European history is located in the D section of the library.  If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.

 

Using the E-Books

We have a number of electronic books (e-books) that you are welcome to use.  There are a few things to remember:

  1. You have to have an account in the library to access the link.  Anyone with a OPSU identification card will have an account automatically.  Anyone else will have to register with the library in person.
  2. Books can be in either HTML, PDF, or an automatic viewing format.  Look at the page thoroughly.
  3. Sometimes the book will have a limit on the number of users who can access the book at once.  If you can't get in, try again later.

Requesting Material the Library Doesn't Own

You have two options if the library doesn't have what you need:

  1. request the material using Interlibrary Loan
  2. request that the library buys what you need

Interlibrary loan requests are made library (borrowing) to library (lending).  If the lending library has what is request, they will send it if they can.  If they can't fill the request, it is then forwarded to another library that should have the material.  Sometimes the process is very quick; other times it could take several weeks.  If you decide to go this route, get your request in early.  The night before your paper is due is not enough time.

You can also request that the library buys the material.  The director of the library looks at all the requests and determines if the library can buy.  Timing and budget constraints are factors in this process.  Not all requests are approved.

 

Overviews

Cover Art
A World Undone - G. J. Meyer
Call Number: D521 .M56 2006
ISBN: 0553803549
Publication Date: 2006-05-30
The First World War is one of history’s greatest tragedies. In this remarkable and intimate account, author G. J. Meyer draws on exhaustive research to bring to life the story of how the Great War reduced Europe’s mightiest empires to rubble, killed twenty million people, and cracked the foundations of the world we live in today. The First World War is one of history’s greatest tragedies. In this remarkable and intimate account, author G. J. Meyer draws on exhaustive research to bring to life the story of how the Great War reduced Europe’s mightiest empires to rubble, killed twenty million people, and cracked the foundations of the world we live in today. From the Hardcover edition.

Cover Art
World War I - H. P. Wilmont
Call Number: D522 .W55 2003
ISBN: 0789496275
Publication Date: 2003-10-06
An integrated history of the war in which text, illustrations, graphics, maps, and timelines combine to give a unique portrait of the conflict, World War I provides an enthralling narrative that explains the causes of the war, the course the war followed, and what made it the most costly and destructive war in the world's history. From the animosity-filled years prior to 1914 through the Treaty of Versailles and from the European campaigns to naval battles, this is a dramatic overview of the world's greatest human conflict.

Cover Art
The World War I Reader - Michael S. Neiberg (Editor)
ISBN: 0814758339
Publication Date: 2007
Almost 100 years after the Treaty of Versailles was signed, World War I continues to be badly understood and greatly oversimplified. Its enormous impact on the world in terms of international diplomacy and politics, and the ways in which future military engagements would evolve, be fought, and ultimately get resolved have been ignored. With this reader of primary and secondary documents, edited and compiled by Michael S. Neiberg, students, scholars, and war buffs can gain an extensive yet accessible understanding of this conflict. Neiberg introduces the basic problems in the history of World War I, shares the words and experiences of the participants themselves, and, finally, presents some of the most innovative and dynamic current scholarship on the war. Neiberg, a leading historian of World War I, has selected a wide array of primary documents, ranging from government papers to personal diaries, demonstrating the war’s devastating effect on all who experienced it, whether President Woodrow Wilson, an English doughboy in the trenches, or a housewife in Germany. In addition to this material, each chapter in The World War I Reader contains a selection of articles and book chapters written by major scholars of World War I, giving readers perspectives on the war that are both historical and contemporary. Chapters are arranged chronologically and by theme, and address causes, the experiences of soldiers and their leaders, battlefield strategies and conditions, home front issues, diplomacy, and peacemaking. A time-line, maps, suggestions for further reading, and a substantive introduction by Neiberg that lays out the historiography of World War I round out the book.

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