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With this award, Oklahoma honors the Native American leader Sequoyah, for his unique achievement in creating the Cherokee syllabary. Sequoyah chose eighty-five symbols to represent all spoken sounds of the Cherokee language.
Last Updated: Jun 23, 2016 URL: http://libguides.opsu.edu/content.php?pid=561040 Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

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SEQYOYAH BOOK AWARDS

 The first Sequoyah Children's Book Award was given in April, 1959, making the award the third oldest children's choice award in the nation.

In 1988, the first Sequoyah Young Adult Book Award was given. Twenty years later the YA book award was changed to “Intermediate Award” and a High School award was created and was first awarded in 2010.

The awards are given annually, usually as an event at the Oklahoma Library Association's Annual Conference.

The Oklahoma Library Association honors Sequoyah for his unique achievement in creating the Cherokee syllabary, the 86 symbols representing the different sounds in the Cherokee language.

His statue is one of the two representing Oklahoma in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

The son of a Cherokee mother and a white trader father, Sequoyah, Cherokee for "Lame One," was also known by his English name, George Guess.

A cabin built by Sequoyah as part of a United States government grant still stands near Sallisaw. This grant was the first given for literary achievement in the United States. 


Each masterlist is created to appeal to children in a variety of situations, interests and reading levels.  The books on the masterlists are not intended to be an automatic recommendation of the books.  Since selection policies vary, one should apply the specific guidelines to each title and purchase those titles that meet individual selection policies.  The masterlists are not to be taken as recommendations that children be encouraged or required to read every title on a particular list. Teachers and other group leaders should carefully read and consider a title before reading a masterlist title to a class or group, or  assigning a title as required reading.  It is not the intention of the committees that every student must read every book on each masterlist.

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